One thing that nobody tells you when you become a full-time salaried person is that you’re going to enter the rat-race and working for a benevolent boss. You’ll be part of a corporate culture that challenges you to be productive every passing minute. However, the unpredictable job promises to give you a certain income on time for sure, with plenty of unexpected twists and turns along the way. Period. In today’s light-hearted take, many frustrated salaried people who are tired sitting in a cubicle and dreaming of freedom from their monotonous “nine to five” tend to turn towards a more practical option — freelancing. Sure, it comes with some amazing benefits like flexibility, control over your work, no narcissist boss and no office politics.

Scroll down below to know the obvious differences showing what working from home is like compared to a regular office job.

– Getting up in the morning

  • Freelancer: I have to online at 10 AM. Indeed, freelancers generally have a lot more flexibility. They are quite flexible to set their own hours, choose the assignments, and increase/decrease the working hours.
  • Salaried Employee: Oh no, I overslept again — a full-time employee begins the day with this very first thought in his head. They have to motivate themselves to get out of bed when the alarm goes off. With the once-standard “nine to five” job, many people are left with no choice except working much longer and expected to be available on email when they’re outside, leaving them with very little time to sleep. Creating a good “work-life balance” looks like a bit challenging task for them.

– Office Politics

  • Freelancer: There is no such thing like Office Politics in the life of a freelancer. S/he works remotely with multiple bosses and usually detached from the office politics.
  • Salaried Employee: Office politics always eclipse the peace of a full-time office employee who landed herself a crushingly mediocre office job and hijack critical organizational processes, resulting in low productivity and power struggles to deal with.

– Control Over Work

  • Freelancer: You have got the total control and power to simply reject any assignment that you’re not that happy about. you have got the privilege to determine the hours you’ll work — although there will be times when you as a freelancer require to align the work (in the pipeline) with the multiple clients you’re supporting. The occupation gives complete and total freedom to work from home, or really, anywhere with internet access.
  • Salaried Employee: They are puppets and their bosses control them yelling what to do with unrealistic deadlines. With a less control over the work, they are expected to complete everything according to the rules of the organization.

– Motivation

  • Freelancer: You’ve to motivate yourself. Find own clients, do own marketing, set up the network and negotiate their own contracts. Folks often face the dreaded loss of motivation, or “Solo Mojo” along with the problems of self-discipline that come with working from home.
  • Salaried Employee: Their ultimate source of motivation — performance reviews at the end of every year, bonus, perks, boss appreciation, promotion and of course, the happening office parties. Also, you can count “Watercooler conversations” as a big motivation to say yes to regular “nine to five” job.

– Job Security

  • Freelancer: It is very unstable and there are chances you end up in a “feast or famine” cycle. Swamped with work for a month and the next few days you can’t find a single project.
  • Salaried Employee: There is no such thing as job security anywhere. Still, many folks count the salaried employment as more secure as you get a regular paycheck on monthly basis and you’ll get some compensation even if you do get fired.

We would love to hear your views on Freelance Versus Full-Time Jobs. And yes, please don’t forget to drop a comment below if you think we’ve missed anything in this post.